English 125b English 125b
Romanticism II

John Burt
Rabb 206 (x2158)
burt@brandeis.edu
Office hours: M, W 4-5 and by appointment


Week 1
Session 1: (January 23) Introduction. Passages from Hume, An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Blake, ``THERE is NO Natural Religion,'' Coleridge, Biographia Literaria, Keats, ``Letter to Benjamin Bailey, November 22, 1817''
Session 2: (January 24) Blake: ``Introduction'' to Songs of Experience, ``Earth's Answer,'' ``The Clod and the Pebble,'' ``The Chimney Sweeper,'' ``The Sick Rose,'' ``The Tyger,'' ``Ah! Sun-Flower,'' ``The Garden of Love,'' ``London,'' ``A Poison Tree,'' ``Auguries of Innocence,'' ``Proverbs of Hell'' (from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
Session 3: (January 28) Wordsworth: ``We Are Seven,'' ``Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey,'' ``The Solitary Reaper,'' ``Strange fits of passion have I known,'' ``She dwelt among the untrodden ways,'' ``I travelled among unknown men,'' ``A slumber did my spirit seal'' (January 28)


Week 2
Session 1: (January 30) Wordsworth :``Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood,'' ``Nutting''
Session 2: (January 31) Wordsworth: ``Resolution and Independence'' (discussion section)
Session 3: (February 4) Keats: ``How many bards gild the lapses of time,'' ``To Charles Cowden Clarke,'' ``On first looking into Chapman's Homer,'' ``On the Grasshopper and the Cricket,'' ``Sleep and Poetry,'' ``On Seeing a Lock of Milton's Hair,'' ``When I have Fears''


Week 3
Session 1: (February 6) Keats: ``Isabella, or the Pot of Basil'' ``The Eve of St. Agnes,'' ``La Belle Dame sans Merci (both versions)''
Session 2: (February 7) (discussion section) ``Lamia''
Session 3: (February 11) Keats:``On the Sonnet,'' ``Ode to Psyche,'' ``Ode on a Grecian Urn''


Week 4
Session 1: (February 13) ``Ode to a Nightingale,'' ``Ode on Melancholy''
Session 2: (February 14) (discussion section) ``The Fall of Hyperion''
Winter Break February 18-22
Session 3: (February 25) ``To Autumn,'' ``This Living Hand''


Week 5
Session 1: (February 27) Keats' Letters: ``To Benjamin Bailey, 22 November 1817,'' ``To George and Thomas Keats 27 December 1817,'' ``To John Hamilton Reynolds 3 February 1818,'' ``To John Hamilton Reynolds 19 February 1818,'' ``To John Taylor 27 February 1818,'' ``To John Hamilton Reynolds 3 May 1818''
Session 2: (February 28) (discussion section) Keats' Letters: ``To Richard Woodhouse, 27 October 1818,'' ``To George and Georgiana Keats, 16 December 1818,'' ``To George and Georgiana Keats 14 February 1819'' ``To Fanny Brawne 25 July 1819'' (and all of the other letters to her in our selection), ``To James Rice 14 February 1820,'' ``To Percy Bysshe Shelley, 16 August 1820,'' ``To Charles Brown 30 November 1820''
Session 3: (March 4) Shelley: ``Alastor''


Week 6
Session 1: (March 6) Shelley: ``Mont Blanc,'' ``Hymn to Intellectual Beauty''
Session 2: (March 7) (discussion section) Shelley: ``Ozymandias,''``Julian and Maddalo,'' ``A Defence of Poetry''
Session 3: (March 11) Shelley: Prometheus Unbound


Week 7
Session 1: (March 13) Shelley: Prometheus Unbound
Session 2: (March 14) (discussion section) Shelley: Prometheus Unbound
Session 3: (March 18) Shelley: Prometheus Unbound


Week 8
Paper 7 due to writing groups
Session 1: (March 20) Shelley: ``Epipsychidion''
Session 2: (March 21) (discussion section) Shelley: ``Adonais''
Session 3: (March 25) Shelley: ``To Jane: The Invitation,'' ``To Jane: The Recollection,'' ``With a Guitar, to Jane,'' ``Lines written in the Bay of Lerici,'' ``The Triumph of Life''


Week 9
Paper 7 due
Session 1: (March 26) Brandeis Thursday (discussion section) Byron: ``English Bards and Scots Reviewers''
Passover Break March 28-April 7
Session 2: (April 8) Byron: ``The Giaour''
Session 3: (April 10) Byron: ``The Giaour,'' ``She Walks in Beauty,'' ``The Destruction of Sennacharib''


Week 10
Session 1: (April 11) (discussion section) Byron: ``Manfred''
Session 2: (April 15) Patriot's Day, classes in session Byron: ``Manfred''
Session 3: (April 17) Byron, Don Juan Canto I


Week 11
Paper 8 due to writing groups
Session 1: (April 18) (discussion section) Byron, Don Juan Canto II
Session 2: (April 22) Byron, Don Juan Canto III
Session 3: (April 24) Byron, Don Juan Canto IV and V


Week 12
Paper 8 due
Session 1: (April 25) (discussion section) Shelley, Frankenstein
Session 2: (April 29) Shelley, Frankenstein
Session 3: (May 1) Shelley, Frankenstein


Week 13
Session 1: (May 2) (discussion section) Tennyson: ``Mariana,''
Session 2: (May 6) Tennyson: ``The Lady of Shallott,'' ``The Lotos Eaters,'' ``Ulysses''
Session 3: (May 8) Browning, ``Fra Lippo Lippi''



Requirements:


There will be short (two pages or so) writing assignments due every Thursday, beginning next week, for the first six weeks of the term. You will pick a passage of about 250 words from the reading for that day or the next and type it out. Be sure to pick a passage which strikes you as rich and interesting and full of a significance that might not be already obvious to every reader of that text. In other words, I don't want you to pick a passage that will enable you to repeat some point I have already made in the lecture, but rather some passage which will enable you to bring a new reflection into our conversation, some passage that casts some new light upon the conversation we have already been having, some light that we might not have seen were it not for you. You will write a two page (or so) commentary on that passage, giving what you take its point to be, noting its context, and developing in cogent detail the claim it leads you to make about the text. Imagine that you are writing for someone who has some knowledge of the text but who does not know what precisely is your point of view about it-someone rather like the other members of this class, for instance. I will not give particular papers letter grades, but I will comment upon them and give them either a check, a check plus, or a check minus. You are to turn the whole lot of them in again at the end of the term, and they will be the basis for your final grade. You may once or twice put off the paper for one session, but I will accept no papers later than that. Attendance at the lectures and discussion sections is mandatory. If you miss one of either, I will expect you to explain to me why in writing at the next class.

There will also be two 6-8 page papers. For these papers, your section will be divided up into ``writing groups'' of four students. You will bring three copies of your paper to give to the other members of your group. You will read and comment upon each other's papers, and get together with your group over the next week to share your remarks. Then a revised version of your paper will be due the following week. Please turn in your commented-upon drafts as well.



Policies


1. Disability If you are a student with a documented disability at Brandeis University and wish to have a reasonable accommodation made for you in this class, please see the course instructor immediately.

2. Attendance and Participation Attendance in this course is required. A student with more than two unexcused absences should expect to fail the course. Participation in the class discussion is required, so come to class prepared to speak. Be sure to bring the books we are discussing, even to the lecture sections, because we will often be focusing in upon particular passages. There may well be classes at Brandeis in which you can coast for much of the term and recover yourself by heroic efforts at the end, but this isn't one of them. It's best to plan to work steadily.

3. Extensions You must contact me no later than the class before a paper is due to receive an extension. I will not grant extensions on the due date of the paper. Late papers will be docked in proportion to their lateness.

4. Academic Honesty You are expected to be honest in all of your academic work. The University policy on academic honesty is distributed annually as section 5 of the Rights and Responsibilities handbook. Instances of alleged dishonesty will be forwarded to the Office of Campus Life for possible referral to the Student Judicial System. Potential sanctions include failure in the course and suspension from the University. If you have any questions about my expectations, please ask.


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On 27 Feb 2002, 17:09.