The links in the table below allow you to test your own visual memory. (The tests are designed for high speed internet access; they do not work well with a dialup connection. For a workaround click.)

The tests use a recognition memory procedure. In each test, one, two or four briefly-presented faces are shown in rapid succession. You try to remember these study faces. Then, right after a warning bell, you will see a briefly-presented test face.

Your task is judge whether that final, test face had been among the preceding study items --in which case you respond yes --, or had not been among the study items --in which case you respond no. You will told whether your answer was correct.

You might want to begin with easy tests --ones in which just a single study face precedes the test face. These one-item tests are accessed via links in the table's left column. Then you might tackle more difficult tests, working up to four study faces (right column). You may find that some of the tests are more difficult than others, even with the same number of study items. The reasons for this variation are given in Kahana & Sekuler (2002).

1 Item 2 Items 3 Items 4 Items
1Item 2Items 3Items 4Items
1 Item 2 Items 3 Items 4 Items
1Item 2Items 3Items 4Items

The faces used in these demonstrations, and in memory studies at Brandeis, are the creation of Hugh R. Wilson and Frances Wilkinson (York University). These faces can be described and manipulated with a multi-dimensional metric space, which makes them useful extremely valuable tools for testing detailed hypotheses about form vision and visual memory. A full description of the faces' generation and properties appears in HR Wilson, G Loffler & F Wilkinson (in press) "Synthetic faces, face cubes, and the geometry of face space" Vision Research.