PAINTING,
PHOTOGRAPHY & FILM

AESTHETICS

Philosophy 113b

Instructor: 
Professor Andreas Teuber 
teuber@binah.cc.brandeis.edu 

Department of Philosophy 
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 
Waltham, Massachusetts 02454 
Tel. 781-736-2787 

Office Hours: 
Tuesday & Fridays 3:00-4:30 PM 
and by appointment 

   Course Description

    Texts

    Articles on Electronic Reserve

    Connect to Electronic Reserves

   Course Requirements

   Museums and Archives Online

   Painter. Photographer and Filmmaker Resources

   Reading List Online

   Course Syllabus

   Final Paper Topic (PHIL 113)

   Academic Integrity and Plagiarism
 



COURSE DESCRIPTION

      

Many of the strategies by which we have been taught to look at images have their origin in a definition of the picture first articulated in the Italian Renaissance: a framed surface or pane situated at a certain distance from the viewer who looks through it to a second world. How well does this model hold up? Is Dutch painting of the seventeenth century no more than a portrait of Holland? Is the relationship of art to the world like that of the eye itself?

We shall discuss the nature of representation in painting, photography, and film, looking closely at examples from the seventeenth century, at the work of Rembrandt, Velasquez, and Vermeer, as well as later works by Manet, Courbet, Degas, Cezanne, Picasso, and the abstract expressionists. We shall also look at the photographs of Atget, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Diane Arbus, Alfred Stieglitz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Richard Avedon and at films of Antonioni, Renoir, and Hitchcock. Use will be made of the collections of art in the Fogg Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


 

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TEXTS


 

Primary texts will be available at the University Book Store:
 

  Barthes, CAMERA LUCIDA, Hill and Wang
  Berger & Mohr, ANOTHER WAY OF TELLING, Pantheon
  Sontag, ON PHOTOGRAPHY, Anchor Books
  Alpers, THE ART OF DESCRIBING, Chicago University Press
  Trachtenberg, CLASSIC ESSAYS ON PHOTOGRAPHY, Leete's
  Gombrich, ART AND ILLUSION, Princeton University Press
  Goodman, WAYS OF WORLDMAKING, Hackett Publishing
  Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED, Harvard University Press
  Danto, TRANSFIGURATION OF THE COMMONPLACE, Harvard
  Foucault, THIS IS NOT A PIPE, University of California Press
         There will also be a number of articles on electronic reserve and on reserve at Goldfarb. See list of Articles on Electronic Reserve below. The course is divided into three sections of approximately five weeks each. Reading assignments are blocked out week by week for each of the three sections. BR> 
 
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ARTICLES ON ELECTRONIC RESERVE

 The following articles are available on the WEB through Electronic Reserve (ELRS) accessible by Password.  To reach Electronic Reserve, you may click here: 

http://www.brandeis.edu/cgi-bin/eres/view.pl 
or type the URL into your browser window and hit "Return." These articles are available to you on the WEB if you enter the appropriate code information.  You may download any article for your own personal use. The Library has put these articles ONLINE as PDF Files. To read the articles, you will need to have Adobe Acrobat Reader. If you do not have Adobe Acrobat, then click on the icon below to download it for free.


 
 
 

Articles on Reserve:


 
 
 

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS


I. CLASS TIMES
 
The course meets on Tuesdays and Fridays: 1:40 PM to 3:00 PM.


II. WRITING
 
Three papers are required on topics growing out of the readings and class discussions. The papers should be about 7 pages in length, preferably typewritten. Paper topics will be available at least ten (10) days before a paper is due. Projected dates for paper topics are October 1st, November 1st, and December 3rd. Papers will be due on October 12th, November 12th, and December 13th.


III. EXAMINATIONS
 
There will be a quiz in class on Friday, December 3rd. There will be no other written examinations, final or otherwise.


IV. GRADING
 
Grading will be broken down as follows: 35% for your strongest essay, 30% for your next best effort, and 25% for the essay which is least successful of the three. The quiz will count 10%.


V. ATTENDANCE
 
Although class attendance will not be taken directly into account in considering an overall grade for the course, attendance is required, and failure to attend may result in a lowering of your grade. You are allowed two unexcused absences.


VI. OFFICE HOURS
 
I will hold office hours from 3:00 to 4:00 PM on Tuesdays and Fridays and by appointment. My office is located in RABB, Room 306. If you wish to leave messages for me, you may do so at the Philosophy Department Office, RABB 305 (Tel. 736-2788) or send me an e-mail at 3teuber@binah.cc.brandeis.edu2



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MUSEUMS AND ARCHIVES ONLINE

 

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PAINTER, PHOTOGRAPHER AND FILMMAKER RESOURCES

 

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SYLLABUS

AESTHETICS

Painting, Photography and Film
Professor Andreas Teuber
Fall 1999

Part I











WEEK 1
Sept. 2
Introduction and Organization


 

WEEK 2
Sept. 7th
Reflections on Photography
Roland Barthes, CAMERA LUCIDA, pp. 3-60
Svetlana Alpers, THE ART OF DESCRIBING, pp. 1-118

Sept. 10th Stubborn Objects
Susan Sontag, "In Plato's Cave," ON PHOTOGRAPHY, pp. 3- 24
Susan Sontag, "Melancholy Objects," ON PHOTOGRAPHY, pp. 51-82


 

WEEK 3
Sept. 14th
Photography: History
Trachtenberg, CLASSIC ESSAYS ON PHOTOGRAPHY:
Edgar Allan Poe, "The Daguerreotype"
Charles Baudelaire, "The Modern Public and Photography"
Anonymous, "Is Photography a New Art?"
Paul Strand, "Photography and Photography and the New God"
Berenice Abbott, "Photography at the Crossroads"
Walker Evans, "The Reappearance of Photography"
Walter Benjamin, "A Short History of Photography"

Allan Sekula, "On the Invention of Photographic Meaning" (ERES)

Sept. 17th Reality and Representation
Nelson Goodman, "Reality Remade"(ERES)
John Searle, "Las Meninas and the Paradoxes of Pictorial Representation"(ERES)
Joel Snyder, "Las Meninas and the Mirror of the Prince"(ERES)
Svetlana Alpers, "Interpretation without Representation, or, the Viewing of Las Meninas"  (JSTOR)


 

WEEK 4
Sept. 21st
More Reflections on Photography
Barthes, CAMERA LUCIDA , pp. 63-109

Susan Sontag, "The Heroism of Vision," ON PHOTOGRAPHY , pp. 85-112
Susan Sontag, "Photographic Evangels," ON PHOTOGRAPHY , pp. 115-49
Susan Sontag, "The Image-World," ON PHOTOGRAPHY , pp. 153-180

Note: Class will not meet on Tues., Sept. 21 (Brandeis Monday)

Sept. 24th Photography and Representation
Roger Scruton, "Photography and Representation" (ERES)
Rudolf Arnheim, "On the Nature of Photography" (ERES)

Trachtenberg, CLASSIC ESSAYS ON PHOTOGRAPHY:
Andre Bazin, "The Ontology of the Photographic Image"
Siegfried Kracauer, "Photography"
Hubert Damisch, "Phenomenology of the Photographic"
John Berger, "Understanding a Photograph"
Roland Barthes, "Rhetoric of the Image"


 

WEEK 5
Sept. 28th
Seeing the World Through Photographs
E. H. Gombrich, "Standards of Truth: The Arrested Image and the Moving Eye" (ERES)
Kendall Walton, "Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism" (ERES)
Edwin Martin, "On Seeing Walton1s Great-Grandfather" (ERES)
Kendall Walton, "Looking Again Through Photographs" (ERES)

Oct. 1st Another Way of Telling?
John Berger & Jean Mohr, ANOTHER WAY OF TELLING (entire)
Paper topics for the first paper will be handed out on Friday,
October 1st. The paper is due on Tuesday, October 12th.


 

WEEK 6
Oct. 5th
Discussion Week



Part II







WEEK 7
Oct. 12th
Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up (1966)
Noel Carroll, "The Power of Movies" (ERES)
Christian Metz, "Photography and Fetish" (ERES)

First Paper is due on Tuesday, October 12th, in class.

Oct. 15th The Ontology of Film
Stanley Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED:
An Autobiography of Companions, pp. 3-15;
Sights and Sounds, pp. 16- 23;
Photograph and Screen, pp. 23-25;
Audience, Actor, and Star, pp. 25- 29;
Types; Cycles as Genres, pp. 29-37;
Ideas of Origin, pp. 37-41;
Baudelaire and the Myths of Film, pp. 41-46;
The Medium and Media of Film, pp. 68-74


 

WEEK 8
Oct. 19th
Jean Renoir's Rules of the Game (1939)
Alexander Sesonske The World Viewed(ERES)
Oct. 22nd Renoir's Genius
Stanley Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED:
More of The World Viewed, pp. 162-230


 

WEEK 9
Oct. 26th
Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954)
Stanley Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED:
The World as Mortal: Absolute Age and Youth, pp. 74-80;
The World as a Whole: Color, pp. 80-101;
Automatism, pp. 101-108;
Excursus: Some Modernist Painting, pp. 108-118;
Exhibition and Self-Reference, pp. 119- 126;
The Camera's Implication, pp. 126-133;
Assertions in Techniques, pp. 133-146;
The Acknowledgment of Silence, pp. 146-160
Oct. 29th Feminist Readings of the Male Gaze
Laura Mulvey, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" (ERES)
Tania Modleski, "The Masters Dollhouse, Rear Window"(ERES)


 

WEEK 10
Nov. 2nd
Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959)
Marian Keane, "The Designs of Authorship:
An Essay on North by Northwest" (ERES)
Nov. 5th Film Itself
Stanley Cavell, "North by Northwest" (ERES)

Paper topics for the second paper will be handed out on Friday, Nov. 5th. Papers are due on Tuesday, November 16th, in class.
 


 




Part III











WEEK 11
Nov. 9th
Versions and Visions
Gombrich, ART AND ILLUSION:
"Psychology and the Riddle of Style," pp. 3-30,
"From Light into Paint," pp. 33-62,
"Truth and the Stereotype," pp. 63-90,
"Pygmalion's Power," pp. 93-115.
Nov. 12th Worldmaking
Goodman, WAYS OF WORLDMAKING:
"Words, Works, Worlds," pp. 1-22
"The Status of Style," pp. 23-40
"When is Art?" pp. 57-70

Alpers, THE ART OF DESCRIBING:
"Epilogue: Vermeer and Rembrandt," pp. 222-228


 

WEEK 12
Nov. 16th
Words and Images
Gombrich, ART AND ILLUSION:
"Formula and Experience," pp. 146-178
"The Image in the Clouds," pp. 181-202
"Conditions of Illusion," pp. 203-241
"Ambiguities of the Third Dimension," pp. 242-287
"The Analysis of Vision in Art," pp. 291-329

Goodman, WAYS OF WORLDMAKING:
"A Puzzle About Perception," pp. 71-90
"The Fabrication of Facts," pp. 91-108
"On Rightness of Rendering" pp. 109-140

Alpers, THE ART OF DESCRIBING:
"Looking at Words," pp. 169-221
"On the Emblematic in Durch Art," pp. 229-235

The Second Paper is due on Tuesday, November the 16th, in class.


 

WEEK 13
Nov. 23rd
Works of Art vs. Mere Real Things
Danto, THE TRANSFIGURATION OF THE COMMONPLACE:
Preface, v-viii
"Works of Art and Mere Real Things," pp. 1-32
"Philosophy and Art," pp. 54-89
"Aesthetics and the Work of Art," pp. 90-114
Nov. 26th Transfigurations
Danto, The Transfiguration of the COMMONPLACE:
"Works of Art and Mere Representations," 136-164, "Metaphor, Expression, and Style," 165-208


 

WEEK 14
Nov. 30th
Representation and Reality Revisited
Foucault, THIS IS NOT A PIPE (entire)
Dec. 3rd Quiz
There will be a quiz in class on Friday December 3rd

Paper topics for the final paper will be handed out in class on Friday, Dec. 3rd after the quiz. The paper is due on Monday, Dec. 13th, by 4:30 p.m. in the Philosophy Department Main Office, Rabb 305.


 

WEEK 15
Dec. 7th
Discussion
Tuesday is the last day of class for the Fall Semester


 

WEEK 16
Dec. 13th
Final Paper
The third and final paper is due on Monday, December 13th by 4:30 PM in the Philosophy Department Main Office in Rabb 305.


 



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