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CONTENTS

BRANDEIS RESOURCES

SUGGESTIONS FOR NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS

Suggestions for writing a paper proposal and bibliographic essay (review of the scholarly literature) for your graduate-level seminars

AREA BOOKSTORES AND WRITERS EVENTS

Literary Magazines and Websites

CAREER RESOURCES

Publishing Your Research: Conferences and Journals

The Job Search

Book Proposals

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

JOURNALS

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDENTS OF EARLY MODERN AND 18TH-CENTURY STUDIES

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDENTS OF THEATRE AND PERFORMANCE STUDIES

GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDENTS OF QUEER AND GENDER STUDIES (under construction)

JOB LISTINGS FOR NOT-FOR-PROFIT, ARTS, EDUCATION, AND HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS

 


BRANDEIS RESOURCES

How to Set Up Your Brandeis E-mail Account

File Storage in Your UNet Space: An excellent way to back up your files!

RESEARCH RESOURCES AT BRANDEIS

 

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SUGGESTIONS FOR NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS

E-MAIL LISTS AND WEB LINKS FOR NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AT BRANDEIS

RESOURCES FOR PLANNING THE CAREER

RESEARCH RESOURCES AT BRANDEIS

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Suggestions for writing a paper proposal and bibliographic essay (review of the scholarly literature) for your graduate-level seminars:

A proposal for a seminar paper generally has four components:

(1) a statement of your critical aims, research question, or theoretical proposition;

(2) a justification for the project (why is this project important?);

(3) a statement of methodology (e.g., use of primary and secondary texts; use of historical sources and archives; and/or choice of a critical approach, such as close reading [New Criticism], feminism, cultural materialism, or biographical approaches to authorial intention and reception); and

(4) a review of the relevant scholarly literature, in the form of a working bibliography or bibliographic essay.

The bibliographic essay (or "review of the field," also called a "review of the literature") helps you develop each component of a proposal but is especially important in terms of justifying the project. Before you begin any extended research project, you need to know what is already out there. What have others written on this topic? What have been the more significant contributions or debates? Has this area already been overly studied? Are there still significant debates on this topic? Has the field "moved on" in another direction?

Likewise, the bibliographic essay helps you situate your own "micro" analysis (or case study) in relation to the "macro" field. Your essay will both offer a specific (narrow) contribution and situate itself in relation to a larger field of inquiry. The bibliographic essay is meant to trace the larger field of inquiry, while the proposal, including the justification, is meant to show how your work will contribute more specifically to that field. This is very important, because in writing your essays, you don't want to reduplicate the work that has already been done by others ("reinventing the wheel"). The bibliographic essay allows you to sketch quickly the precedent scholarship on which you're building your own work.

You'll probably incorporate the bibliographic essay into your seminar paper, either in an introductory section or in one or more discursive footnotes.

Reviewing the literature thoroughly may mean that you will have read more materials than you'll actually discuss directly in your seminar paper (although you may cite these materials in your bibliographic sketch of the field). Nevertheless, all your reading contributes to the authority with which you write on your topic. Likewise, by reading widely, you'll notice which contributions and which debates are cited more than others, giving you a better sense of the expectations of your audience. With what debates and scholarship will your audience already be familiar? What debates will your audience expect you to address? What are your audience's likely objections?

In a conference situation, an authoritative grasp on the field allows you to answer questions posed by your audience as well as engage in collegial conversation with others interested in the same field.

 

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AREA BOOKSTORES AND WRITERS EVENTS

Back Pages Books: From the website: "As the first bookstore in Waltham in over a decade, Back Pages has followed a path of using a small space to promote big ideas through a mixture of new and used books, author events, civic activism, and advocacy for the arts in Waltham."

Brookline Booksmith: Brookline and Wellesley locations, sponsors readings and other literary events. Follow link to sign up for weekly events announcements.

Brookline Booksmith's Writers and Readers Series.

The Center for New Words: "The Center for New Words is dedicated to a simple mission: To use the power and creativity of words and ideas to strengthen the voice of progressive and marginalized women in society." Subscribe for weekly event reminders.

Harvard Bookstore: Click on the "subscribe" to sign up for weekly events announcements.

Porter Square Books

 

USED BOOKS

Alibris.com

McIntyre and Moore Booksellers: "Used, rare, and out-of-print books in more than 200 subjects" (Porter Square, Cambridge, MA).

Powell's Books: Great online used bookstore. Sign up for newsletters by clicking link on home page.

 

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LITERARY MAGAZINES AND WEBSITES

Blithe House Quarterly: "Queer Fiction Lives Here"

The Center for New Words: from the website: "The Center for New Words is dedicated to a simple mission: To use the power and creativity of words and ideas to strengthen the voice of progressive and marginalized women in society."

The Cortland Review: An online literary magazine in RealAudio.

PENNsound: A project of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania. An online archive of recordings originally compiled and published from Keele University, England, by Dr. Richard Swigg in 1992 and 1993.

 

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CAREER RESOURCES

RESOURCES FOR PLANNING THE CAREER (for new graduate students in The Department of English)

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Explore the Career Services pages provided by the Brandeis Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS). (If this link does not work, surf to the GSAS homepage and click on "Resources for Current Students"--"Career Services").

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FOR ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDENTS:

Explore the website of the Association of Departments of English (ADE). There you'll find useful reports and resources about graduate study, the job market, the job search, and career outcomes for recent Ph.D.'s, such as the following:

From the ADE homepage, click on "Reports and Resources" and follow the link to "Advice to Graduate Students: From Application to Career".

From the ADE homepage, click on "Job Information List" and follow the link to "ADE and ADFL Online Job Counseling." This enormously useful resource gives information about the kinds of teaching, research, and administrative careers you may expect at a variety of different institutions and provides the following advice:

Planning a Career after Graduate School
Developing an Academic Career
Developing a Nonacademic Career
When and Where to Look for an Academic Job
C.V.s, Dossiers, Application Letters, Writing Samples, and Portfolios
Interviews, Campus Visits, Job Talks, and Teaching Demonstration
Negotiating Special Situations
Job Offers

From the ADE homepage, click on "Job Information List" and follow the link to "Career and Job Market Information." Here you will find placement statistics and a link to the .pdf document Career Information for Graduate Students and Junior Faculty Members. This document lists additional bibliography and web resources. Copies of this document are also available from Shannon Hunt.

From the ADE homepage, click on "Reports and Resources" and follow the link to "Final Report of the MLA Committee on Professional Employment".

From the ADE homepage, click on "Facts and Figures" and follow the links to information on employment trends and placement data.

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Visit the main web site for the Modern Language Association (MLA). In addition to information about the annual convention and MLA style, you'll find the following useful resources:

From the "Resources" tab on the MLA homepage, click on "Surveys, Reports, and Other Documents" and follow the links to:

Advice for Authors, Reviewers, Publishers, and Editors of Scholarly Books and Articles

The Future of Scholarly Publication

Graduate Education and the Job Search

"MLA Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession"

"Statement of Professional Ethics"

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The Chronicle of Higher Education's "Grad-School Life" online forum: Multiple bulletin boards, on which you can discuss your concerns as a graduate student, teaching fellow, and job seeker.

Includes: the "Dissertators and Thesis Writers Support Thread".

The Chronicle of Higher Education's "C.V. Doctor" page: "CV for an A.B.D. in the Humanities."

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PUBLISHING YOUR RESEARCH: CONFERENCES AND JOURNALS

CFP (CALLS FOR PAPERS) E-MAIL LIST (University of Pennsylvania): Announcements of solicitations of papers for conference panels, special topics issues of journals, etc. Includes archived CFPs and instructions for subscribing.

To subscribe to the list, point your browser to: http://cfp.english.upenn.edu/cfp.html.

Information from the list owners: "We encourage conference or panel organizers and volume editors to find the largest possible audience for their announcements by posting them on this list and web archive. Announcements can include upcoming conferences, panels, essay collections, and special journal issues related to English and American literature, and can include calls for completed papers, abstracts, and proposals. The boundaries are flexible: all English-language literatures, cultural studies, literary theory, bibliography, humanities computing, and comparative literature (even when not concerned specifically with English or American literature) are within the pale. Conferences or panels devoted exclusively to literature not in English, to music or art, to history, etc., are excluded unless they are relevant to students of English and American literature, as are lecture series, regular meetings of small local societies, fellowship opportunities, etc. Essay competitions and prizes are excluded unless they will result directly in publication or presentation of a paper. Calls for creative writing are also excluded. Due to the volume of postings and the fact that each posting must be approved and edited by hand, the CFP list and web archive is only for calls for papers, not for general conference announcements."

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Tomorrow's Professor Msg. #548 PUBLISHING YOUR RESEARCH - UNDERSTANDING THE JOURNALS MARKET

Tomorrow's Professor Msg.#754 On Journal Rejection

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THE JOB SEARCH

Begin here: Professor Caren Irr's Job Search Timetable (2007): A very helpful overview of the job search process, with a number of links to useful resources!

Interfolio.com: A web dossier service that allows graduate students to set up and send out their own dossiers.

From the website: "Interfolio allows you to create an electronic portfolio so you can manage your important credentials and documents online. Your portfolio can include letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae, writing samples, dissertation abstracts, teaching certifications, student evaluations, and more." One benefit of Interfolio is that applicants can tailor each dossier to the particular job by designating which letters to include in each dossier. Moreover, applicants may feel that they have greater control over the process; they can also overnight dossiers for last-minute applications.

Tomorrow's Professor Msg. #749 Campus Interview - The Research Presentation

Professor Susan Lanser recommends the Job-Interviewing Handout, a guide to the campus interview prepared by Michael Gamer and Anne Krook at U-Penn.

See also resources listed under the ADE, MLA, and Chronicle of Higher Education, above.

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BOOK PROPOSALS:

Links to University Presses and Other Publishers: Use the following links to find book manuscript submissions guidelines for individual university presses (and other presses publishing academic manuscripts). From the home page for a specific press, follow the links to contact information, staff directories, and submissions/proposals guidelines. You'll eventually find specific guidelines for submitting a book proposal. Look for information about the kinds of books each press seeks to publish (their "list" or "catalogue").

It is increasingly important to consider the kinds of books that are likely to be published before you choose a dissertation topic.

American Association of University Presses: AAUP Member Presses

The World Wide Web Virtual Library: Publishers

 

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PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

 

For all research and teaching fields:

Association of Departments of English (ADE)

Modern Language Association (MLA): Publishes PMLA, Profession, and the MLA Newsletter.

 

For students of early modern and eighteenth-century studies:

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS): Publishes Eighteenth-Century Studies and Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture.

Northeast American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (NEASECS)

The Renaissance Society of American (RSA): Publishes Renaissance Quarterly

 

For students of theatre and performance studies:

American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR): Publishes Theatre Survey.

Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE): Publishes Theater Studies and Theatre Topics. For scholars and teachers of the history, practice, and criticism of theatre. Members of ATHE tend to teach in Theatre departments, while members of the MLA tend to teach theatre and drama in ENG depts.

Mid-America Theatre Conference (MATC): Publishes Theatre History Studies.

Performance Studies International (PSI)

 

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JOURNALS

(See Professional Societies, above, for journals published by area-specific professional societies.)

 

List of Journals in Theatre and Performance Studies (maintained by ATHE)

 

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GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Tips for locating grants and fellowships:

(1) Check the list of "Fellowships and Grants" in the annual September issue of PMLA and in the quarterly numbers of the MLA Newsletter. (Copies are available in the department office.) Check the Modern Language Association (MLA) online.

The September PMLA is the most thorough listing of grants and fellowships opportunities in Literatures and Languages, updated annually. Many fellowship opportunities are specifically targeted to doctoral candidates, recent Ph.D.s, and junior faculty. Various deadlines.

(2) Check the bulletin boards by the graduate student mailboxes for announcements of fellowships, post docs, and employment opportunities.

(3) The Brandeis English Department maintains an online list of fellowship opportunities.

(4) Explore the External Funding Opportunities compiled by the Brandeis Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS); see also the overview of Financial Aid and Fellowships. (If these links do not work, surf to the GSAS homepage and click on "Resources for Current Students"--"Financial Aid and Fellowships"--"Outside Sources of Funding.")

Information from GSAS: "GSAS has created a list of 53 major grant sources that are opportunities for graduate students to apply for outside funding for research, travel and support while writing a dissertation. This is a rich compendium of government, non-profit, and private funding sources. It is arranged sequentially by deadline dates. Each opportunity is briefly described and followed by its URL. GSASFYI will keep you informed of these deadlines as they come up, and we will share new opportunities that are sent to GSAS during the year."

(5) The Brandeis Office of Sponsored Programs can lead you to thousands of funding resources through its web page. OSP also provides online documents to assist with the grant writing process.

 

Others databases of grants and fellowships:

Cornell University Graduate School Fellowships Database

 

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Grants and Fellowships for Students

of Early Modern and Eighteenth-Century Studies:

Visiting Research Fellowships offered by The American Antiquarian Society: The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) is an independent research library founded in 1812 in Worcester, Massachusetts. The library's collections document the life of America's people from the colonial era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Collections include books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, broadsides, manuscripts, music, graphic arts, and local histories.

Grants, Prizes, and Fellowships Listed by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS)

ASECS Travelling Jam-Pot: Fund for Graduate Students: Funds assisting graduate student travel to the annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS). Award recipients are ABDs and PhDs within a year after receiving doctoral degree). An award of up to $300 will be given toward the cost of attending the ASECS annual meeting; conference registration fees will also be waived for successful candidates. Application deadline is typically 1 November.

Research Fellowships at the Massachusetts Historical Society

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies Dissertation and Postdoctoral Fellowships

 

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Grants and Fellowships for Students

Of Theatre and Performance Studies

 

American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR) Dissertation Research Fellowship

 

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Grants And Fellowships For Students Of Queer And Gender Studies

(Under Construction)

 

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JOB LISTINGS FOR NOT-FOR-PROFIT, ARTS, EDUCATION, AND HUMANITARIAN ORGANIZATIONS:

The ADE Job Information List (Association of Departments of English): also known as the "JIL."

Association of Fundraising Professionals Job Center

Chronicle Careers: Jobs in Higher Education (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

The Chronicle of Philanthropy's Philanthropy Careers

The Community Career Center, an on-line gathering place where not-for-profit employers and management personnel can meet one another.

HigherEdJobs.com

Idealist.org: "Action Without Borders"

NonprofitOyster.com

Nonprofit Professionals Advisory Group: From the website: "The Nonprofit Professionals Advisory Group is dedicated to building the capacity of nonprofit organizations, associations, institutions of higher education, the public sector and the professionals who make them run smoothly. We offer services for people nationwide who seek employment in the nonprofit sector -- resume writing, cover letter editing and job search consulting -- and for nonprofits themselves -- strategic hiring, search, training, planning and communications counsel."

OpportunityKnocks.org

 

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