Home  |  Reading |  Electronic Reserves   | Online Forum  |  E-mail  me

.
AESTHETICS:
PAINTING
PHOTOGRAPHY
AND FILM


PHIL 113B
Spring 2002

COURSE PAGE INDEX

MUSEUMS AND ARCHIVES ONLINE

 

back to top


PAINTER, PHOTOGRAPHER AND FILMMAKER RESOURCES

 

.

  Back to top

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Spring 2002:

       Many of the strategies by which we have been taught to look at images have their origin in a definition of the picture first articulated in the Italian Renaissance: a framed surface or pane situated at a certain distance from the viewer who looks through it to a second world. How well does this model hold up? Is Dutch painting of the seventeenth century no more than a portrait of Holland? Is the relationship of art to the world like that of the eye itself?

        We shall discuss the nature of representation in painting, photography, and film, looking closely at examples from the seventeenth century, at the work of Rembrandt, Velasquez, and Vermeer, as well as later works by Manet, Courbet, Degas, Cezanne, Picasso, and the abstract expressionists. We shall also look at the photographs of Atget, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Diane Arbus, Alfred Stieglitz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Richard Avedon and at the films of Antonioni, Renoir, and Hitchcock.

  Back to top



TEXTS FOR COURSE

1. Barthes,
CAMERA LUCIDA Hill and Wang.

2. Sontag, ON PHOTOGRAPHY,
Anchor Books.

3. Trachtenberg, CLASSIC ESSAYS ON PHOTOGRAPHY,
Leete's Island Books.

3. Berger and Mohr, ANOTHER WAY OF TELLING,
Pantheon.

4. Gombrich, ART AND ILLUSION,
Princeton University Press.

5. Goodman, WAYS OF WORLDMAKING,
Hackett.

6. Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED,
Harvard.

7. Danto, THE TRANSFIGURATION OF THE COMMONPLACE,
Harvard.

8. Foucault, THIS IS NOT A PIPE,
University of California Press.

  Back to top

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

CLASS TIMES:

(1) The course will meet on Tuesdays and Fridays from 1:40 PM to 3:00 PM in POLLACK.

  Back to top


PAPERS:

(1) Three papers are required on topics growing out of the readings and class discussions.

(2) The papers should be between about 7-8 pages in length, preferably typewritten.

(3) Paper topics will be available at least ten (10) days before a paper is due. It is wise to make a copy of a paper before handing in the original. If you are working on a computer, make a back-up. .

  Back to top


EXAMINATIONS:

(1) There will be one quiz in class.

(2) There will be no other written examinations, final or otherwise.

  Back to top


ONLINE FORUM:

(1) A Bulletin Board has been created for the course to facilitate online conversation on legal topics of note. To find your way to the Bulletin Board, you can click HERE and you'll be directed to the Course page for the WebCt. In order to use this forum, you need to be registered and enrolled in the course.

(2) You may also keep a log. The log should not be used for general note-taking or for jotting down quotations (although you may wish to use a separate note-book for these tasks) but for making commentaries on the readings and, most critically, the puzzlers and cases.

(3) Questions will also arise throughout the semester, questions for which there may not necessarily be any, easy or obvious answers, and these questions will be singled-out and identified as questions for the Bulletin Board and logs. You should also feel free to respond to the answers and commentaries of other students in the class.

  Back to top


ATTENDANCE:

(1) Attendance is required. You are allowed two unexcused absences. Any further absences will have an impact on your final grade.

  Back to top


GRADING:

(1) Grading will be broken down as follows: 35% for your strongest essay, 30% for your next best effort and 25% for the one which is least successful of the three.

(2) . Work in the log or journal and/or on the Bulletin Board will count for 5% and the quiz will make up for the remaining 5%.

  Back to top


COURSE ASSISTANTS:

(1) Several course assistants have been assigned to this class. They will be primarily responsible for reading papers and making comments on them. I shall read through ALL the papers and be responsible for grading each and every one of them.

  Back to top


OFFICE HOURS

(1) I will hold office hours on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. and by appointment.

(2) My office is located in RABB, Room 306. If you wish to leave messages for me, you may do so at the Philosophy Department Office, RABB 305 or on my voice mail: 736-2787

(3) My e-mail address is teuber@brandeis.edu.

  Back to top

 

Home  |  Reading |  Electronic Reserves   | Online Forum  |  E-mail  me

Page last edited: Fenruary 1, 2002