PAINTING,
PHOTOGRAPHY & FILM

AESTHETICS

Philosophy 112b

Instructor: 
Professor Andreas Teuber 
teuber@binah.cc.brandeis.edu 

Department of Philosophy 
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 
Waltham, Massachusetts 02254 
Tel. 781-736-2787 

Office Hours: 
Tuesday & Fridays 3:00-4:30 PM 
and by appointment 


 

  • Course Description

  • Texts

  • Articles on Reserve

  • Course Requirements

  • Course Syllabus


     



    COURSE DESCRIPTION

          

    The course focuses on the relation of the individual to the state and, in particular, on the theory and practice of non-violent resistance (civil disobedience), its aims, methods, achievements, and legitimacy.
     

    Many of the strategies by which we have been taught to look at images have their origin in a definition of the picture first articulated in the Italian Renaissance: a framed surface or pane situated at a certain distance from the viewer who looks through it to a second world. How well does this model hold up? Is Dutch painting of the seventeenth century no more than a portrait of Holland? Is the relationship of art to the world like that of the eye itself?

    We shall discuss the nature of representation in painting, photography, and film, looking closely at examples from the seventeenth century, at the work of Rembrandt, Velasquez, and Vermeer, as well as later works by Manet, Courbet, Degas, Cezanne, Picasso, and the abstract expressionists. We shall also look at the photographs of Atget, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Edward Weston, Walker Evans, Diane Arbus, Alfred Stieglitz, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Richard Avedon and at films of Antonioni, Renoir, and Hitchcock. Use will be made of the collections of art in the Fogg Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


     

    back to top

    TEXTS


     

    Primary texts will be available at the University Book Store:
     

      Barthes, CAMERA LUCIDA, Hill and Wang
      Berger & Mohr, ANOTHER WAY OF TELLING, Pantheon
      Sontag, ON PHOTOGRAPHY, Delta
      Foucault, THIS IS NOT A PIPE, University of California Press
      Gombrich, ART AND ILLUSION, Princeton University Press
      Cavell, THE WORLD VIEWED, Harvard
      Danto, THE TRANSFIGURATION OF THE COMMONPLACE, Harvard
             There will also be a specially prepared Reading Packet with articles that will be on electronic reserve and on reserve at Goldfarb. The course will be divided into three sections of approximately five weeks each. Reading assignments will be blocked out week by week and will be handed out for each section.BR> 
     
     back to top

    ARTICLES ON ELECTRONIC RESERVE

     The following articles are available on the WEB through Electronic Reserve (ELRS) accessible by Password.  These articles are available to you on the WEB if you enter the appropriate code information.  You may download any article for your own personal use:
     

    Articles on Reserve:










     
     
     

     back to top

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS


    I. CLASS TIMES
     
    The course meets on Tuesdays and Fridays: 1:40 PM to 3:00 PM in Olin Sang 116..


    II. WRITING
     
    Four papers are required on topics growing out of the readings and class discussions. The papers should be about 7 pages in length, preferably typewritten. Paper topics will be available at least ten (10) days before a paper is due.


    III. EXAMINATIONS
     
    There will be a quiz in class on Friday, December 3rd. There will be no other written examinations, final or otherwise.


    IV. GRADING
     
    Grading will be broken down as follows: 30% for your strongest essay, 25% for your next best effort, 20% for the next, and 15% for the essay which is least successful of the four. The quiz will count 10%.


    V. ATTENDANCE
     
    Although class attendance will not be taken directly into account in considering an overall grade for the course, attendance is required, and failure to attend may result in a lowering of your grade. You are allowed two unexcused absences.


    VI. OFFICE HOURS
     
    I will hold office hours from 3:00 to 4:30 on Tuesdays and Fridays and by appointment. My office is located in Rabb, Room 306. If you wish to leave messages for me, you may do so at the Philosophy Department Office, Rabb 305, or by phone at 736-2788.



     back to top

    SYLLABUS

     
     

    back to top

     

    BACK TO

    ANDREAS
    TEUBER'S
    HOME PAGE