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DEMOCRACY &
DISOBEDIENCE

Professor Andreas Teuber


FALL 2002





COURSE PAGE INDEX

Course Description -- Topics and areas of philosophy covered in the course.

Texts -- Books to be purchased for the course.

Course Requirements -- Writing assignments, class participation, grading procedures, examinations, office hours, etc.

Syllabus -- Reading and writing assignments broken down week by week. THE FIRST FOUR WEEKS ARE NOW ONLINE.

Paper Topics -- Paper topics will always be posted at least ten days before a paper is due. . Paper Topic I, Paper Topic II,.Paper Topic III and.Paper Topic IVwill all be posted here online on the same date that the paper topic is handed out in class.

Class Online Forum -- NOTE: Click here and you'll be directed to a Coure Listings Option Page. Scroll down to PHIL S-7: Introduction to Philosophy.

Academic Honesty & Plagiarism -- Definitions and examples of plagiarism plus comprehenisive guidelines on when and how to cite sources.

What is Philosophy? -- Philosophy is quite unlike any other field. It is unique both in its methods and in the nature and breadth of its subject matter. Philosophy pursues questions in every dimension of human life, and its techniques apply to problems in any field of study or endeavor. No brief definition expresses the richness and variety of philosophy. It may be described in many ways. It is a reasoned pursuit of fundamental truths, a quest for understanding, a study of principles of conduct. It seeks to establish standards of evidence, to provide rational methods of resolving conflicts, and to create techniques for evaluating ideas and arguments. Philosophy develops the capacity to see the world from the perspective of other individuals and other cultures; it enhances one's ability to perceive the relationships among the various fields of study; and it deepens one's sense of the meaning and variety of human experience.

Classic Texts of Western Philosophy -- Here you will find a selection that provides a database of over 100 links to classic texts by major Western philosophers throughout history, in chronological order, from PLATO to SARTRE.

Philosophers Say "Cheese" -- You have read the book. Now see what they look like. By clicking on any name of a philosopher on this page, you will be connected directly to a site on the Internet exhibiting an image or image gallery of that philosopher. By clicking on an image with a blue or purple surround, you will be connected to an enlargement of that image.

Guide to Research in Philosophy -- This is a guide to library research in the field of Philosophy. It contains a selective list of resources that may be helpful for getting started. Please consult a reference librarian for additional assistance. Links appearing on this page are to catalog records in LOUIS (the online catalog of the Brandeis University Libraries) including reference tools such as books, electronic indexes and abstracts, full text resources, or governent documents. Internet sites and other research resources are also indicated by highlighted titles which are active links.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

FALL 2002:

The course will focus on the relation of the individual to the state and, in particular, on the theory and practice of non-violent resistance (civil disobedience), its aims, methods, achievements, and legitimacy. The course will be divided into five parts:

(1) An opening section in which the examples of Antigone, Socrates, Thoreau, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King will be discussed.

(2) A second section devoted to a philosophical examination of the nature of obligation, the role of civil disobedience in a democratic society, the arguments which may be made to justify its practice, the role of conscientious objection, and the relation between protest and civil liberties.

(3) A third section which will include an exploration of the conflict between authority and autonomy and the grounds for giving one's allegiance to any state at all, the legitimacy of non-violent resistance in different kinds of state (e.g. South Africa, and, China), civil disobedience and corporate authority, and the obligations of oppressed minorities.

(4) A fourth section devoted to an examination of the future of democracy in this country and throughout the world.

(5) And a concluding section devoted to a study of several contemporary examples of non-violent resistance, in particular, non-violent resistance in opposition to world trade agreements in Seattle, Washington, D. C. and Prague, disobedience in China and Northern Ireland, and the use and/or abuse of civil disobedience at abortion clinics.

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MAIN TEXTS FOR THE COURSE

  • Sophocles (496-406 B. C.) ANTIGONE, Dover Thrift Edition.
    Also ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Plato (428-348 B. C.) THE TRIAL & DEATH OF SOCRATES, Dover Thrift Edition.
    Also PLATO'S APOLOLOGY IS ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE
    And PLATO'S CRITO IS ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Thoreau (1817-1872 B. C.) CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE, Dover Thrift Edition, Also ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • M. K. Gandhi (1869-1948) NON-VIOLENT RESISTANCE, Dover,
    Also GANDHI on "TRUTH" and GANDHI on "NON-VIOLENCE" ONLINE BY CLICKING ON "TRUTH" and "NON-VIOLENCE".

  • Martin Luther King (1929-1968) WHY WE CAN'T WAIT, Signet,
    Also KING on "NON-VIOLENCE" (Text) and on "NON-VIOLENCE" (Video) ONLINE BY CLICKING ON "NON-VIOLENCE" (Text) and ON "NON-VIOLENCE" (Video)

  • Robert Paul Wolf IN DEFENSE OF ANARCHISM, University of California. Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Robert Dahl ON DEMOCRACY, Yale University Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • James Fishkin DEMOCRACY AND DELIBERATION, Yale University Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Stephen MacEdo DELIBERATIVE POLITICS, Oxford University Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Will Kymlicka and Wayne Norman (eds.) CITIZENSHIP IN DIVERSE SOCIETIES, Oxford University Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Robert Richie , Stephen Hill and Joshua Cohen (eds.) WHOSE VOTE COUNTS, Beacon Press,
    Also see COMPLETE TEXT ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • REPLIES: (1) McKINLEY
    (2) FEREJOHN
    (3) ROSENKRANZ
    (4) COX
    (5) CANTOR
    (6) MIRKARIMI
    (7) THIGPEN
    (8) THIGPEN (9) RICHIE & HILL RESPOND

  • Martha Nussbaum FOR LOVE OF COUNTRY, Beacon Press,
    Also see SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

  • Neva Welton and Linda Wolf GLOBAL UPRISING, Beacon Press,
    Also see EXCERPTS FROM THE BOOK ONLINE BY CLICKING HERE

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    COURSE REQUIREMENTS

    CLASS TIMES:

    (1) The course will meet on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 1:10 PM to 2:00 PM in GOLDING 110.


    PAPERS:

    (1) Four papers are required on topics growing out of the readings and class discussions.

    (2) The papers should be about 5 pages in length, preferably typewritten.

    (3) Paper topics will be available at least ten (10) days before a paper is due. It is wise to make a copy of a paper before handing in the original. If you are working on a computer, make a back-up. .


    EXAMINATIONS:

    (1) There will be one quiz in class.

    (2) There will be no other written examinations, final or otherwise.


    ONLINE FORUM:

    (1) A Bulletin Board has been created for the course to facilitate online conversation on philosophical issues of surrounding the topics of democracy and the role of citizens To find your way to the Bulletin Board, you can click HERE and you'll be directed to a page where you can Log On to the courses in which you have enrolled for the Fall, among them, no doubt, DEMOCRACY & DISOBEDIENCE. To Log On you may need to use your UNET ID and PASSWORD.

    (2) You may also keep a log or a journal. The log should not be used for general note-taking or for jotting down quotations (although you may wish to use a separate note-book for these tasks) but for making commentaries on the philosophical questions that puzzle you.

    (3) Questions will also arise throughout the term, questions for which there may not necessarily be any, easy or obvious answers, and these questions will be singled-out and identified as questions for the Bulletin Board and logs. You should also feel free to respond to the answers and commentaries of other students in the class.


    ATTENDANCE:

    (1) Attendance is required. You are allowed three unexcused absences. Any further absences will have an impact on your final grade.


    GRADING:

    (1) Grading will be broken down as follows: 30% for your strongest essay, 25% for your next best effort, 20% for your next best effort after that, and 15% for the one which is least successful of the four.

    (2) . Work in the log or journal and/or on the Bulletin Board will count for 5% and the quiz will make up for the remaining 5%. (NOTE: This is slightly different in structure than the structure outlined in the syllabus handed out on Thursday.


    FILMS:

    Two films will be shown during the semester (times to be announced): "The Montgomery Bus Boycott" from EYES ON THE PRIZE, and STOPPING HISTORY, a documentary about protest against the proliferation of nuclear weapons.


    COURSE ASSISTANCE:

    (1) Two teaching fellows have been assigned to this class. They will be primarily responsible for reading the papers and making comments on them. I shall read through ALL the papers and be responsible for grading each and every one of them.


    OFFICE HOURS

    (1) I will hold office hours on Mondays and Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. and by appointment.

    (2) My office is located in RABB Room 306, although I am often in RABB 336.. If you wish to leave messages for me, you may do so at the Philosophy Department Office, or e-mail me at teuber@brandeis.edu .

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    Page last edited: August 29, 2002