COMING INTO ONE'S OWN



 
 
 

USEM 27B

Instructor:
Professor Andreas Teuber
teuber@binah.cc.brandeis.edu

Department of Philosophy
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
Waltham, Massachusetts 02554
Tel: 781-736-2788
Rabb 306

Office Hours:
Tuesday & Fridays 3:00-4:00 PM
and by appointment

Writing Lab
Odyseeus Makridis
makridis@binah.cc.brandeis.edu
Department of Politics
Tel: 781-7362781
Rabb 369
Office Hours: To be announced

   Course Requirements

   Texts Online

    Texts

   Web Resources

   Course Syllabus
 
 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

       Much of the literature of the early modern period can be read as an attempt to give meaning to human activities whose reference points were no longer fixed in a stable system of deference and authority, to transform the villains and vagabonds who first appeared along the highways and in the rapidly expanding cities of 15th and 16th century Europe into prototypes of humanity itself.

  With the collapse of the old imagery of "hierarchy" and "harmony" these new "individuals," cut loose from their social moorings, set adrift from their rural estates, without a master or secure social place, needed new symbols and images to orient them in the world.

  How is a person to act in a world without definite limits or the benefit of fixed principles?

  The course will examine the problems of acting in a world where the outward signs denoting inner life are no longer believed to be adequate.
 
 

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS


 
 

Class Times

 The course will meet on Tuesdays, and Fridays from 1:40 PM to 3:00 PM in Olin-Sang 124.

Writing

     Four  papers are required on topics growing out of the readings and class discussions. The papers should be about 5 pages in length, preferably typewritten. Paper topics will be available at least ten (10) days before a paper is due. It is wise to make a copy of a paper before handing in the original. If you are working on a computer, make a back-up.

USEM Logs (Journals)

     You  shall also be asked to keep a log or journal throughout the semester.  The log should not be used for note-taking or for  jotting down quotations or for making commentaries on the readings (although you may wish to use a separate note-book for these tasks), but should be reserved exclusively to give and develop your own answers to certain basic questions on human rights issues.  Questions will arise throughout the semester, questions for which there may not necessarily be any, easy or obvious answer, and these questions will be singled-out and identified as questions for the logs.  Arrangements shall also be made to have these questions ON LINE and to make it possible for anyone in the class to put their answers on a BULLETIN BOARD as well as the opportunity to comment upon and respond to readings and to the answers and commentaries of other students in the class. I have already created a Bulletin Board for the course which is located on the Internet at http://www.brandeis.edu:8900. Once you have found the course number (USEM 27B), you will need to create your own account and your own password to gain access.

Examinations

 There will be a short-answer quiz in class towards the end of the semester.  There will be no other written examinations, final or otherwise.

Grading

     Grading will be broken down as follows: 30% for your strongest essay, 25% and 20% for your next best efforts respectively, and 15% for the essay which is least successful of the four. Participation in class discussion and/or on the Bulletin Board will count for 5% and the quiz will make up for the remaining 5%.

Attendance

Attendance is required.  You are allowed two unexcused absences.  Any further absences will have an impact on your final grade.

Office Hours

     I shall hold office hours from 3:00 to 4:00 PM on Tuesdays and Fridays and by appointment. My office is located in RABB, Room 306 (Tel. 736-2787).

Messages

      If you wish to leave messages for me, you may do so on my Voice Mail at 736-2787 or my e-mail address: TEUBER@binah.cc.brandeis.edu.
 

 

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TEXTS


 

Primary texts will be available at the University Book Store:
 

         A number of the texts fot the course are also available on the Web. Where this is the case, I have entered a link to the text in the Syllabus. A complete list of texts available on the Web are listed under Texts Online. I have also set up links to various sites on the Internet for each of the authors whose work we shall be reading in the course. If you click on the name of one of the authors above, you will be forwarded to the relevant page for that particular author. From time to time I shall pass out handouts or selections from texts or establish links to sites that may help us come to grips with the subject matter of the course. several pages have already been created. The short essay by Francis Bacon is already Online and several other Handdouts as well:
I have also created several pages with links to a variety of sites that may help you - in some more measure - with your writing:

Writing Aids and Resources on the Internet


 
 
 

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TEXTS ONLINE

 The following texts are available on the WEB. Please be careful to note any and all copyright information that accompanies any one of these texts. The present "Fair Use" provision of the Copyright Law does permit you to read all of these texts Online and in many, if not all instances, to download the text for your own personal use.
 
 
(1) "The Prince" 
by Niccolo Machiavelli
(8)  "Pride and Prejudice
  by Jane Austen
(2)  "Hamlet"
  by William Shakespeare
 (9)  "The Stange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde"
  by Robert Louis Stevenson
(3)  "The Cask of Amontillado"
  by Edgar Alan Poe
(10)  "Bartleby: The Scriviner"
  Herman Melville
(4)  "Rameau's Nephew"
  by Denis Diderot
(11)  "The Double"
  by Fyodor Dostoevsky
(5) "The Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals"
   by Immanuel Kant
(12)  "The Secret Sharer"
  by Joseph Conrad
(6)  "Self-Reliance"
  by Ralph Waldo Emerson
(13)  "The Heart of Darkness"
  by Joseph Conrad
(7)  "The Adventures of Huckelberry Finn"
  by Mark Twain
(

 

SYLLABUS

COMING INTO ONE'S OWN

The Making of Modern Identity
Professor Andreas Teuber
Spring 1999



 
 
 
 
 

Part I

WEEK 1
January 19th
Introduction and Organization
January 22nd Self-Images of the Modern Age
Machiavelli, "THE PRINCE" (Text Online)
WEEK 2
January 26th
Appearance and Being
Machiavelli, THE PRINCE(Text Online)
January 29th "The Thing's To Do"
Shakespeare, HAMLET(Text Online) nbsp;
WEEK 3
February 2nd
A Double Life?
Shakespeare, HAMLET(Text Online)
February 5th Revenge as Comic Tragedy
Poe, "The Cask of Amontillado" (Text Online)
Bacon, "On Revenge" (Class Handout Online) nbsp;

Paper topics for the first paper will be handed out on Friday,
February the 5th. The paper is due on Tuesday, February the 16th, in class.
 

WEEK 4
February 9th
The Death of Virtue
Diderot, RAMEAU'S NEPHEW(French Text Online)
February 12th Freedom and Self-Consciousness
Diderot, RAMEAU'S NEPHEW (French Text Online)

Part II


WEEK 5
February 16th
Resurrecting Morality
Kant, GROUNDWORK FOR A METAPHYSICS OF MORALS (Text Online)

First Paper is due on Tuesday, February 16th, in class.

WEEK 5
February 19th
Pulling Oneself Up By One's Own Bootstraps
Kant, GROUNDWORK FOR A METAPHYSICS OF MORALS (Text Online)
WEEK 6 Midterm Recess
February 22 - February 26
WEEK 7
March 5th
Lighting Out for the Territory
Twain, HUCKLEBERRY FINN(Text Online)
Chapters I-XV

There will be no class on Tuesday, March 2,
since Tuesday is a Brandeis Thursday.

WEEK 8
March 5th
The Dangers in vs. of Society
Twain, HUCKLEBERRY FINN(Text Online)
Chapters XVI-"The Last"
February 19th Pulling Oneself Up By One's Own Bootstraps
Emerson, "Self-Reliance"(Text Online)

Paper topics for the second paper will be handed out on Friday,
March the 12th. The paper is due on Tuesday, March the 23rd, in class.
 

Part III

WEEK 9
March 16th
A Manner of Truly Speaking
Austen, PRIDE AND PREJUDICE(Text Online)
March 19th The Value of Intelligence and Wit
Austen, PRIDE AND PREJUDICE(Text Online)
WEEK 10
March 23rd
The Theatricality of Everyday Life
Goffman, THE PRESENTATION OF SELF 
Introduction and Chapter 1, pp. 7-76

The Second Paper is due on Tuesday, March 23rd in class

March 26th Alone with No Excuses
Sartre, EXISTENTIALISM & HUMAN EMOTIONS 
pp. 9-76.
.
WEEK 11
March 30th
On Being and Nothingness
Goffman, THE PRESENTATION OF SELF 
pp. 208-237

Sartre, "Bad Faith" (Class Handout Online) nbsp;
and "Play-acting"(Class Handout Online) nbsp;

There will be no class on Friday, April the 2nd,
the beginning of Spring Break.

Spring Break
April 1 - April 8
WEEK 12
April 9th
A Second Self
Dostoevsky, THE DOUBLE( Text Online)

There will be no class on Tuesday, April 6th,
since Tuesday is still in Spring Break.

Paper topics for the third paper will be handed out on Friday,
April the 9th. The paper is due on Tuesday, April the 20th, in class.

WEEK 13
April 13th
Dark Twins in vs. of Society
Stevenson, DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE(Text Online)
April 16th One(Self) or The Other
Freud, CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS
WEEK 14
April 20th
Double Trouble
Melville, "Bartleby, the Scriviner" (Text Online)
April 23rd Swimming Lessons
Conrad, "The Secret Sharer" (Text Online)

The Third Paper is due on Tuesday, April 20th, in class

WEEK 15
April 27th
The Other Half
Conrad, HEART OF DFARKNESS (Text Online)
April 30th Earning a Living
Miller, DEATH OF A SALESMAN 

There will be a quiz in class on Friday, April 30th.

Paper topics for the fourth paper will be handed
out on Friday, April, 3oth, after the quiz. The fourth and
final paper is due on Monday, May 10th by 4:30 PM in
the Philosophy Department Main Office in Rabb 305.

WEEK 17
May 4th
Goodbye To All That
Miller, THE DEATH OF A SALESMAN 

Tuesday is the last day of class for the Spring Semester

WEEK 18
May 4th
Final Paper
The fourth and final paper is due on Monday, May 10th by
4:30 PM in the Philosophy Department Main Office in Rabb 305.